If you are in immediate danger call 111 For non-emergency police assistance call 105

Glossary

A B C D E F G H I J N O P R S T V W Y

A

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Adjournment
When a court sitting, or any other case meeting, is put off to a later date and/or location.

Appeal
A request to a court to change a decision e.g. type of sentence, length of sentence

B

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Bail
When police release someone who's charged with a crime on the condition that they attend future court hearings.

Beyond reasonable doubt
Proved, through evidence that a crime happened

C

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Callover
A meeting to get the case ready for trial.

Giving permission for something to happen. A person doesn't have to verbally say 'no' or fight back to show that they haven't consented.

Court Victim Advisor
A Ministry of Justice staff member who can explain the court process and keep victims informed on the progress of their case.

Crown Prosecutor
Crown prosecutors are crown solicitors and lawyers who appear for all prosecutions in the High Court and those in the District Court where the defendant has chosen trial by jury on behalf of the Crown

D

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Defendant
The person accused of the crime.

Dock
The place where the person accused of the crime will stand (or sit) during their trial.

E

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Evidence
Various things presented in court to prove an alleged fact i.e. videos, witness statements.

Extended Supervision Order
Extended supervision orders are issued by a court and allow the Parole Board to set special conditions - like GPS monitoring - for serious offenders, sexual offenders and high risk violent offenders once they are released into the community.

F

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forensic
Forensic is used to describe the work of scientists who examine evidence in order to help the police solve crimes.

G

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Give evidence
Answering questions about what happened to you.

H

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Home Detention
Home detention is when an offender serves their prison sentence, or part of the sentence, at an approved residence. Offenders on home detention wear an electronic device so their movements can be monitored.

Homicide
When a person is killed by another person.

I

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Inadmissible evidence
Evidence that can't be used in a trial.

J

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Jury
Twelve people from the community who decide if the person is guilty or not guilty.

N

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Non-contact order
Stops an offender who was sent to prison, for more than two years, from contacting you in any way. The Judge can impose certain conditions such as not living, visiting or working in particular areas.

O

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Offender
Person convicted of a crime (before being found guilty, the person charged with the offence is called 'defendant').

P

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Parole
When an offender is allowed out of prison to finish their sentence in the community. They must follow certain conditions.

Parole Board
A Parole Board decides whether an offender is ready to be released from prison

Plea
A formal answer to a charge given in court e.g. guilty or not guilty.

Police Officer In Charge
Your main contact person with the police for your case.

Pre-sentence reports
Report prepared by professionals such as a probation officer to help the Judge decide on a sentence.

Preventive detention
Prisoners may be released on parole but remain managed by Corrections for the rest of their life and can be recalled to prison at any time.

Prosecutor
The lawyer who presents the case against the person accused of a crime.

Protection Order
A protection order means an offender can be arrested if they hurt, threaten or approach you or your children. You can apply for a protection order if you're in a domestic relationship with the offender. A judge can include a protection order in a sentence

R

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Restorative Justice
Restorative Justice lets victims tell an offender how they have been affected, have a say in how the harm can be repaired, and begin to resolve some of the effects of the crime. A meeting is called a restorative justice conference.

S

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Sentence
The consequences of the crime for the offender if they've pleaded or been found guilty.

Sentence Indication
A statement by the court that provides the person accused of the crime an idea of the type and length of the sentence for their charge/s.

Sentencing
This is when the Judge decides what happens to the offender if they've pleaded or been found guilty.

Serious crime
A crime of a sexual nature or other sexual assault, a crime that resulted in serious injury or death or that led the victim to have ongoing fears for their safety or the safety of one or more of their immediate whānau.

Sexual Assault
Sexual Assault is a broad term used to cover all types of sexual offending, including rape.

T

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Trigger
Something (a place, sound, smell or something else) that causes distress by bringing back feelings of a traumatic experience.

V

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Verdict
Formal judgement whether someone is guilty or not guilty

Victim Impact Statement
A record of how the crime has affected the victim. This is usually done in writing, but can include photographs, drawings or poems. A judge must consider it when sentencing an offender. The victim can read the statement to the court just before sentencing

Victim Notification Register
A confidential list used by criminal justice agencies to keep victims informed about the offender, such as where the case is in the court process, if there's a temporary release from prison and when the offender is up for parole.

Victims Code
The Victims Code sets out how you can expect to be treated when you are a victim of crime.

W

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Witness
A person who tells the court about what they have seen, heard or experienced.

Y

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Young people
A person between the ages 14 - 17

0800 650 654 - 24/7 Victims Information Line
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